Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Genetics  (Read 3863 times)

Offline Storm Windfall

  • Ensign
  • *
  • Posts: 126
  • Reputation: 172
    • Lotus Fleet
Re: Genetics
« Reply #10 on: 07 August 2009 09:59 AM »
I find genetics fascinating, in sofar as to change my major from allied medicine, to genetics. 

The most important factor that has been determined in interfertility and cross breeding, is that the female will decide the outcome.  Any humaniod species, and yes, ALL life forms, are capable of inbreeding, by the fact that all living organisms share the same set of 60 genes, whether it is a blade of grass, monkey, snake, bird or human.

The only deciding factor is the chromosome count.  The male should have LESS than the female.  Half breeds are possible, but further interbreeding can be tricky, because such offspring usually carries the same amount of chormosomes, male and female alike.

First set of children usually cannot breed within their own species, i.e klingon/human or human/klingon, whereas it will be more viable to breed with another pure species.

Well, I tried to keep it simple!  Feel free to ask away. :)
Fleet Captain Storm Windfall
Newsletter Editor
Lotus Fleet
http://www.lotusfleet.org/

Offline Cleopatra

  • Ensign
  • *
  • Posts: 145
  • Reputation: 234
  • Future Teacher
Re: Genetics
« Reply #11 on: 07 August 2009 07:21 PM »
It's alright. I love complexity. It's one of the reasons I like Cardassians so much. In Star Trek I know the interbreeding is mostly to reflect and challenge our societies' view of race. They are still revelant, because a teacher at my school is in an interracial marriage. This couple isn't sure if they want to have children because of the way the world is.

I don't think interbreeding it common in Star Trek. They are usually the children of soldiers or diplomats in. People that go off planet and are comfortable with other species.

Do you think I am right that Vulcan genes are dominant? I think they would are because Vulcans adapted to survive in a harsh enviornment.

And why do you think Sela's a blond? Is it random mutation or are Human genes dominant over Romulan genes?
Time is the fire in which we burn. -Gene Roddenberry


Offline Storm Windfall

  • Ensign
  • *
  • Posts: 126
  • Reputation: 172
    • Lotus Fleet
Re: Genetics
« Reply #12 on: 13 August 2009 09:28 AM »
No, interbreeding isn't common in Star Trek, though all of the 'half'-breeds featured quite prominently.

Proving why Sela is blond, will take up a lot of graphic space, something i am not yet up to par with.  It maybe because her mother was blond? Science has proven over time that there will have to be a dominant gene for every characteristic, i.e boys will in most cases inherit their coloring from their father, and girls from their mother. With the human genes diluted over the ages, it would stand to reason that other recognizable features like ridges, ears, etc., be prevalent. The same can apply vice versa.

Proven also, is that the same 60 genes that is needed when a new organism is formed, can combine to infinity, resulting in different organisms with the same genes. Time, conditions and environment playing a major role in the finished product.

It is also interesting to note that the same 60 genes, and the protein therein, can be found in EVERY living organism on earth, and maybe in the universe, from a blade of grass right up to humans.
Fleet Captain Storm Windfall
Newsletter Editor
Lotus Fleet
http://www.lotusfleet.org/